Inconsiderately Polite

College Students' Views on Etiquette Online

Pecha Kucha: Walk Through a Slide and Reflection

This semester in my third module of my introduction to writing arts class called technologies and future of writing my blog group and I have been looking at how new Web 2.0 technologies are changing the rules of etiquette online.  We even discovered that there is a new word to refer to etiquette used online or in digital spaces known as “netiquette.”  In our presentation for the Pecha Kucha, which has 20 slides with each shown for 20 seconds and only 1 image per slide, we highlighted aspects of “netiquette” online that we think are important for everyone to known in this evolving world of technologies that will continue to grow.

A Walk Through a Slide

In my section of the presentation I discussed the term “netiquette” and how it was derived, along with how rules online are changing and evolving with new technologies.  For one of my slides, I wanted to highlight the importance about how new rules form with new technologies and different communities elicit different etiquette rules.  For example, when you are on Facebook, you can talk more informally than you would if you were on a professional site looking for a job.  This is a crucial point that my group’s blog on etiquette has discussed in many of our posts because we want to make sure people understand “netiquette’s” importance when being online.

I chose to use a quote from Sherry Turkle’s article “Who Am We” that discusses how the Internet links millions of people together and changes how communities are created.  I thought that this quote fit in well with this part of the presentation because her quote ties into the point that we are linked to so many people on the Internet that we need to be aware of online “netiquette” rules that different sites and online communities have.  It also drives home the point that how we act and behave online effects more than just ourselves, and this is why we need to be conscious of “netiquette” rules.  Also, my picture for this slide was a sketch of a world with people around it linked together.  I thought it fit in well with Turkle’s quote and brings into perspective that what we write online links us to people all over the world.  Therefore, we need to be aware of our actions in different online spaces.  I also mention how it can be hard to learn all the new “netiquette” rules because they are learned through experience and are constantly changing.  I think that this is important because everyone will make mistakes online, and it is understandable, but we need to realize that how we act online effects more than just us.  I would say a good tip is to think before you post or press send.

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I wanted this slide to really drive home the point that “netiquette” rules are important to be aware of when using online spaces.  I think, as a part of my 5 slides in the presentation, it allows people to see that “netiquette” rules are important because of how expansive the Internet allows our connections and communities to be and every site is different in terms of their rules.  It also sets up the fact that new “netiquette” rules will continue to evolve because of the new technologies and online spaces being developed every day.  My slide builds on the idea that our world will not stop developing and evolving technologies, so “netiquette” is important to keep in mind when interacting on the Internet daily, whether in be in online games, social media, or professional sites.   I mention that the rules are hard to learn, but I think if I had to change something about this slide, it might be adding in the fact that everyone will make mistakes online, but we need to be award of our actions and how they affect.  This allows people to feel that it is alright if they would make a mistake, but to maybe think next time about how their actions will affect others and reconsider pressing send.

 

 

What I Learned about my Blog Topic

Over the past few weeks, I have really learned a lot about our topic of etiquette in online spaces.  I think that looking more into this topic has taught me just how expansive and ever-changing Web 2.0 technologies are, and how etiquette online is becoming an important aspect of this growth.  I mean the whole reason for the term “netiquette,” or network and Internet etiquette, is because of the new Web 2.0 technologies that are gaining in popularity each day.  In “Who Am We” by Sherry Turkle, she discusses how people assume different online identities when on the Internet, but more importantly that “the Internet links millions of people in new spaces that are changing the way we think and the way we form our communities.”  This really make me think just how important “netiquette” really is because if we are linked to so many people through the Internet, than we are effecting more than just ourselves when we post, write, or act a certain way online.  I think that by interacting more in online spaces, especially Twitter, I have seen how much social media connects us to other people.  Social media has its advantages, and if we are aware of our actions and how we behave online, it can be a great way to connect and communicate with others.

Another important thing that I learned about online etiquette is that there are different rules for different sites, which can make them hard to learn because you learn through experiences and observations online.  On a blogging site called Gigaom, in an article titled “The Future of Online Etiquette is Already Here-It’s Just Unevenly Distributed” written by Matthew Ingram he says, “As anyone who has missed an important email knows by now, modern communications etiquette is a minefield of unspoken expectations and potential anxiety-inducing behavior.”  This quote allowed me to realize that because of all the new Web 2.0 technologies, and with the rules not written down, we are expected to know what the online etiquette rules are, which can cause for anxiety and stress.  Ingram also points out that this is because people are at different stages in their evolution from one technology to another.  Everything is changing and evolving so quickly, that it can be hard to keep up with all the new etiquette practices.

Overall, I have learned that “netiquette” has become such an important part of our world because of how much Web 2.0 technologies are evolving and changing.  It will not go away either because children in this generation and generations to come will grow up in the age of technology.  It will affect how they apply to college or interact with the world.  New technologies already impact how we interact on a daily basis.  I think one of the major things that I learned is that we need to be aware of how we act online because you never know who you are effecting.  Learning the new “netiquette” rules will allow for more effective communication in online and digital spaces.

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The New Age of Technology and Etiquette

This week I read an article called “How Companies Learn Your Secrets” by Charles Duhigg, which looks at how companies can learn your shopping habits by examining routines and buying habits.  He goes on to talk about  how it is hard to change a person’s shopping patterns once they are set, but if you catch a person at the right moment, like when someone is having a baby, they are more vulnerable to change.  Andrew Pole, a statistician, was hired by Target to do analysis into shopping patterns of consumers in order, “to analyze all the cue-routine-reward loops among shoppers and help the company figure out how to exploit them.”  He took particular focus into targeting women who were expecting a baby.  After accumulating data, he noticed certain shopping patterns emerging, which all came from the women’s registries or from something called a Guest ID.

Everyone has a Guest ID number, which shows what you have bought in the past at a certain store and allows for companies to send certain coupons based on what you have bought in the past.  Companies know that once your shopping patterns and routines are set you are unlikely to change them, which makes it easy to use the Guest ID and send coupons based on things you are likely to buy again.  Duhigg also mentions that, “linked to your Guest ID is demographic information like your age, how long it takes you to drive to the store, your estimated salary, whether you’ve moved recently, what credit cards you carry in your wallet and what Web sites you visit.”  Is this going overboard and breaking the rules of etiquette associated with technology?  I thought that this concept was interesting and made me think about etiquette rules that should be used with technology.  If companies can use technology to access this type of information and analyze shopping patterns, what else will they be able to do?

It is amazing to think how technology has allowed for such data to be recorded, and then to be used in a way that creeps into our lives un-expectantly.  So, is it proper etiquette that companies can do such a thing as use a Guest ID?  I think that a lot of people are not even aware of this happening to them.  While, some might feel exploited, others may say that it is helpful because they get coupons for the things they want and will buy each month.  I think that this shows the power of technology, and how much it has grown over the last decades.

Throughout this blog, I have been looking at technology and etiquette, which is now referred to as “netiquette.”  It seems like “netiquette” will only continue to be a growing issue.  I mean if companies can access our shopping habits, what else will they be able to do in the future?  Look at Facebook and its ads.  The ads on the side of the screen are put there because they are targeted towards the things you like, and what kind of things you post on your wall.

The bigger question I think is:  what else will technology allow us to access and what new “netiquette” rules will come into practice?  While this all may seem like people are trying to creep into our lives, it is a part of the world now that has been brought on with the increased and advanced use of technology.  I think that it is important for companies and online site to keep etiquette, or “netiquette,” rules in mind because it will allow for consumers to keep buying products, (while not feeling like they are being too violated) and the companies to keep customers coming back to buy more.

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Children and Online Etiquette: What Do They Need To Know?

I began to think about how etiquette online will effect this generation of children that are growing up in this booming age of new technologies.  As it seems, there is no way to avoid the technology that will most likely become a large part of children growing up in this age of evolving technological devices.  As Kevin Kelly states in his article “Becoming Screen Literate” that, “Everywhere we look, we see screens.”  It is becoming a part of our culture.   Children need to be aware of etiquette online, also known as “netiquette,” because it directly affects them and is going to be a daily part of their lives.

While it may be easier for children growing up in this age of technology to adapt to new technologies because they have seen it since they were young, they may not know all of the “netiquette” rules.  As Laila Weir states it the article “Behaveyourself.com:  Online Manners Matter” that, “Understanding how to interact online safely and effectively is, and will be, ever more critical.  As today’s students grow older, they’ll be using the Internet to apply to colleges and jobs, and to communicate with colleagues.”  Children and students in this generation will be more likely to use the Internet to do these types of activities.  How they act online, what they say, and how they portray themselves will matter.  It is a different world now because it used to be that you did a lot of tasks, like applying for a job, by interacting face to face.  The person could interpret what you were saying easier because they could directly hear and see you.  Nowadays, people are using the Internet to apply to jobs and communicate with others.  It can be hard to tell if you are saying something in a certain way online, through an email or message, because people cannot read your body language or hear your voice directly.  People may take what you say in a different way than you intended.  This is why as Weir states, “Yet our children, however much they seem to have been born with iPods growing out their ears, haven’t learned to handle digital communications by osmosis, any more than they innately knew how to write a resume or hold a fork.”  So, even though children are using technology at a young age, they are not innately born with the online etiquette skills that are so important in this day and age.

With this in mind, I think that parents and educators need to begin to teach children what netiquette is, especially when they begin to use social networking sites.  It needs to be known that what you post online can have consequences and come back and affect you in the future.  I think that being careful about what you post on social media sites, or say about others, is one of the biggest etiquette rules to follow.  Children and students need to be able to communicate online in an effective manner because, let’s face it, we are turning into a culture of screens and technology.  A lot of things done face-to-face can now be done online, and it seems to be the most natural way for this generation of children and students to communicate.  With guidance about what the rules of etiquette online are, I think that this generation growing up in this booming and evolving world of technology, can use it to their advantage, communicate effectively, and learn how to appropriately present themselves online.

Here’s a site that you can use to help teach children about manners and etiquette online:  http://www.commonsensemedia.org/advice-for-parents/manners-digital-age

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Perhaps the Bird?

I’ll admit: when I first found out I had to give up Facebook for a week, I was pretty cocky about it. I’d gone without it for much longer before and I barely even missed it. I figured, hey, I use Tumblr more often anyway, this is going to be a breeze.

And in certain aspects, it was. I have gone the week successfully without checking Facebook once. I deleted the app from my phone and took down the shortcut from Chrome. I didn’t go through withdrawal like an addict, unable to sleep dreaming of my next fix, feeling imaginary ants crawling all over my skin (is that even a symptom of withdrawal..?). But, I have to say, I’m happy I’m getting it back tomorrow. See, what made not having Facebook hard was the fact that I’ve come to depend on it for communication in a lot of ways. Three of my friends and I have this ongoing chat affectionately titled “Coven de brujas” (de brujas meaning of witches in Spanish), the last of many inside jokes.

That became the easiest way to contact three of my closest friends for a whole bunch of things. As I’m from North Jersey, two of the chat members live far away, so this chat became the closest thing we have to hanging out together in real life. Sometimes we’d send a link to something moronic and anger-inducing so we can share how mad we are with each other. Other times, it’s asking for an opinion, and I’ve even posted written assignments for them to proofread. It was this chat that I missed the most this past week. I would find myself wanting to share something with them, but when I realized I couldn’t post it on the chat, I felt at a loss. There wasn’t a convenient way to send them all a link and have their shared response. The most recent example I can thing of is this necklace: I wanted to buy it, but I couldn’t choose between the bird or the cage.

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Without facebook, I had to settle for other methods of communication. I ended up texting them, but that took away the option to send them to the listing itself.

This example probably seems like a minor inconvenience, and it was. Honestly, that’s what not having Facebook for a week was: a minor inconvenience.

A day after I stopped using the site, I got a haircut. It was a pretty dramatic change in length, and I was feeling a bit insecure about it. What I wanted to do, as everyone does when they change their appearance somehow, was post a picture to Facebook to show it off. I thought maybe a few likes would help me feel more confident about my new hair, but then I remembered I couldn’t. Along with the times I missed the Coven De Brujas, this was the only time I really missed Facebook. I eventually settled for posting a picture on Instagram and on Tumblr, and I did end up getting a few likes and comments, and I did feel better about it.

This week has shown me that I don’t really need Facebook, but I’m still glad to get it back.

P.S.

I still haven’t decided on whether I want the bird or the cage, so feel free to leave a comment with your suggestions!

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New Technologies, New Etiquette

Our world is transforming into one where we are more and more involved online and in virtual communities.  Science has allowed, as Vannevar Bush writes in the article “As We May Think,” for, “the swiftest communication between individuals” (2).  This fast communication is seen in the evolution of the computer, and as Bush further writes, “knowledge evolves and endures throughout the life of a race rather than that of an individual” (2).    This made me think that if there is such vast knowledge that can spread quickly because of the fast communication that the computer has now provided, then how does our etiquette online impact and influence people?  Also, how aware do we need to be of what we are doing online because it does affect more than just us?  I think that we need to remember that what we are writing online impacts and influences more than just us, and that what we write can spread quickly with the development and efficiency of the computer.  Where we are at with technology is probably not where we will stay because new technologies are evolving that we may not know about yet.  With these new technologies, there will be new implications for how we should act online with the development of new technologies.  Even though Bush was writing this in 1945, he surely is ahead of his time, with the prediction of a machine that can store and access all types of information easily and quickly, which would later become the computer.  Now with the computer we can access information in ways that we could have never imagined and create worlds that were once unthinkable.

Now we can easily and quickly access all types of information and be a part of various virtual communities while taking on different identities.  This is one of the points that Sherry Turkle discusses in her article “Who Am We?  She talks about the lives of people who assume different online identities that are different from their own real life selves (1-12).  Turkle says in the article that, “the Internet links millions of people in new spaces that are changing the way we think and the way we form our communities” (1).  Because the Internet links us to so many people in many different places, we need to be aware of how we act, depending on the people we are interacting with.  Different communities elicit different etiquette practices.  If you were in a professional online community, you would want to be polite and talk about such things as work, where in an online SIM game you may talk more about personal issues and be more informal.  Also, the ideas of people creating different identities (that may or may not resemble their true self) also lend to the issue of etiquette practices online.  As Turkle mentions, “slippages often occur in places where personal and self merge, where the multiple personae join to compromise what the individual thinks of as his or her authentic self” (6).  So, people may create multiple online identities to showcase the different parts of themselves or to create personas to act in ways they wish they did in real life.  Do people feel that they can behave this way because it is in a virtual world?  How should we act in a virtual world?  Is it acceptable that people are deceiving others through different identities and how much do other people really care?  As Margaret Atwood says in the article “Atwood in the Twittersphere” that “you’re always saying things you shouldn’t have said” (1).  So, with new technologies etiquette practices may change, and because of way the Internet links us to so many people around the world, we need to be careful and conscious how we act online.

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Bye Bye to Books?

The two readings by J.D. Bolter, from his book Writing Space: Computers, Hypertext, and the Remediation of Print,  allowed me to further understand the transition from print to the digital age, which benefits me greatly because this is the topic I chose to write about for Dr. Tweedie’s Big Assignment in my Intro to Writing Arts class at Rowan University. Both of these chapters have allowed me to further support my thesis in that paper, that the concept of reading has changed with every new technology and will continue to change. As we have already learned from the previous modules of the Intro to Writing Arts class, people always argue against the newest technology, but what really stuck out to me was when Bolter stated “ printing did displace handwriting, in the sense that the printed book became the most highly valued form of writing.” (2). He goes on to explain later that the same thing has happened between printing and technology, “Both as authors and as readers, we still regard books and journals as the place to locate our most prestigious texts” (3) but the shift from print to the computer is still happening at a rapid pace.

I enjoyed reading these pieces by Bolter because it put into words exactly how I feel about the change between print and technology. There change is inevitable, and maybe printed text will still exist in my lifetime, but I truly believe one day it won’t. I also truly believe that is okay. Reading and writing has continuously adjusted with every new technology, so there is no reason that should not continue. In fact, writing itself was once considered a technology. Plato

himself described the alphabet as a “techne” which is the greek root of technology (Bolter 15).

jban37lThe part of this reading that I found most interesting was when Bolter started to discuss the idea of writing being “virtual.” When I think of something being virtual, I immediately think of something that has to do with computers and the internet. However, Bolter states that, “ electronic writing may also be virtual, yet all previous writing technologies were virtual as well” (18).  I liked this thought because I feel that it further supports the transition from printed text to digital text is a natural transition for writing and should be a natural transition for humans.

My favorite quote from both of these chapters is when Bolter says, “Digital media are refashioning the printed book” (3). I believe that this quote sums up what I have read in these chapters. Digital media is changing how we read, how we produce written work, how we layout out written work, and many other aspects that relate to writing and reading.

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Anxious Over Change

For my Introduction to Writing Arts course, I was assigned to readings by Bolter on the change from printed texts to digital ones. To be honest, the idea that we are in “late age of print” scared me a bit. It’s embarrassing to admit; after all, I’m a young college kid. I’m not supposed to be technologically inept for at least another fifteen years. Yet there I was, feeling anxious. Bolter writes that “linear forms such as the novel and the essay may or may not flourish in an era of digital media” (6). I have never been one to handle uncertainty well. As a writing major, I have set myself up to spend my life writing. All I know, all I’ve been taught my entire life, are these so-called linear forms of writing. In fact, my intention was creative: I wanted to create novels. A risky idea already, as my friends and family love to remind me, but now they might just cease to exist? Bolter continues on to say that “prose itself is being forced to renegotiate its cultural role” as the visual becomes the way to present information (Bolter 6). Still, I am not a “Visual Arts” major, and I am not being trained in the visual.

Upon forcing myself to think about it longer, however, I understand that prose becoming less linear does not necessarily mean that I will have nothing to do with my talents and that I will end up cold and homeless (no matter what my anxiety will have me believe).

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In “Writing as Technology,” Bolter talks about the ways newer technologies “define themselves by borrowing from, paying homage to, critiquing, and refashioning their predecessors” (24). In particular, I’m interested in the example of games: “computer games remediate film by styling themselves as ‘interactive movies'” (Bolter 25). The video game industry, for all its flaws, has really grown. Games have the ability to tell a story in a way that novels or movies can’t. They have become far more story-driven than they were in the beginning. I always toyed with the idea of trying to become a video game writer, but I gave up on the idea because I felt I wasn’t good enough at games. Reading what Bolter had to say about the evolution of writing, however, I feel like this is the perfect option for me. Even if the novel is dying out, the video game surely isn’t. And, fortunately for me, my ability to write is far better than my ability to complete a game on its hardest difficulty.

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A Shift in Time: How Writing Technologies are Changing the Way We Write

Bolter talks about the change in writing that is occurring because of the introduction of new technologies.  In his article Writing as a Technology he says that, “It is not a question of seeing writing as an external technological force that influences or changes cultural practice; instead, writing is always a part of culture” (Bolter 19).  Throughout time, I have noticed that the space I choose to write in has changed.  I used to write drafts to my work by hand, and then go to a computer.  Now, I start typing drafts from the computer immediately.  I think for me it is easier because I can type as fast as I’m thinking, and I something I have wrote with more flexibility.  Bolter notes this flexibility as a quality that makes the computer different from printed material, and that we may begin to associate more with this quality as we use the computer more (Bolter 3).  While writing was always a part of my culture, the way and space that I write in has taken on a different form because writing as a technology is transforming.  I think another way that technology impacts the world today, as Bolter says in his article Writing as Technology is that, “the sum of the technical and social interactions that constitute a writing system” are changing the technology of writing (Bolter 20).

For myself, I think that social media has allowed me to see that it is not only the writer that writes something for people to see, but then the readers can respond, creating a world of connection and constant communication between people.  When I look on Twitter, I see all of the original tweets, but it is the reader’s responses that create the conversation and allow for more reader involvement than there is with printed text.  As Bolter puts it, “such tensions between monumentality and changeability and between the tendency to magnify the author and to empower the reader have already become part of our current economy of writing” (4).  This shows the impact that blogs and social media have on writing and how it is changing the way we communicate.  Not only that, but, electronic writings “permit the reader to share in the dynamic process of writing and to alter the voice of text” (Bolter 9).  What the writer initially writes may change due to the voice of the readers that join in while, the writing space that is formed by the computer is “animated, visually complex, and malleable in the hands of both the writer and reader” (Bolter 13).  This forms the social connections that not only myself, but everyone around the world has with each other.  When new media develops, they try to claim that they can improve our lives in some way or how we connect with others.  As consumers of this media, we fall in this trap, because I think are always looking for easier and faster ways to connect with others in this new age of technology.

More on Bolter from his book “Writing Spaces:  Computers, Hypertext, and the Remediation of Print”

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Inconsiderately Polite

College Students' Views on Etiquette Online

Identifying John Doe

Do you really know who you're talking to?

Safety In The Machine

Welcome to the Jungle

Always There, Never Gone

Being unchanged indefinitely.